Tuesday, February 15, 2011

"Family farmers & ranchers don't need spokeman, we are the spokesman"

Tonight's blog is a quote from Troy Hadrick, a South Dakota rancher who has a passion for sharing the story of American Agriculture. Follow Troy on his blog: Advocates for Agriculture and be inspired. I look forward to reading about his future adventures. Troy's quote inspired me to start the Master of Beef Advocacy program. This has been on my ever-so-long "To Do List" and there is no better time then the present to dive in! National Cattlemen Beef Association started this program for beef producers to be able to effectively communicate with consumers how beef is raised and the steps that must be reached in order for the safe, wholesome and nutritious product to reach the dinner table. My goal is to complete 1 course each week; making April 1st my completion date and being an official "Master of Beef Advocate". I am looking forward to sharing with you my weekly reading and assignments I participate in. Course 1 reading are complete along with my 50 word essay where I was asked to comment on a news article. The readings featured Modern Beef Production. It is important to realize that all producers are dedicated to raising safe, wholesome, and nutritious beef for your family to enjoy. The range in the product results in different ways cattle are raised. However all are common in the safety and nutritional benefits. When at the beef counter at your local supermarket keep in mind what the different choice you are presented with actually mean. I will highlight on four options you all have seen. Grain-Finished (Conventional) beef- This type of beef assures a consistent, year-round supply of high quality beef with tenderness and flavor most consumers prefer. Grain-finished beef cattle spend most of their life in pasture conditions. At 12-18 months of age they are transported to a feedlot where they receive a carefully balanced diet. Natural Beef- The USDA defines natural as a product that is minimally processed and contains no additives. Labels may read: "raised without hormones", "free range", and "vegetarian fed". Make sure you read the labels. Grass-Fed Beef- These cattle only eat a grass and forage-based diet throughout their whole lifespan. Most grass-fed beef is raised in Australia or New Zealand where grass is grown year-round. Certified Organic Beef- Cattle must be fed 100% organic feed, and they may not be given hormones to promote growth or antibiotics for any reason. Regardless of the type of beef chosen, consumers are be confident the beef is safe, wholesome and nutritious. On a final note: I would like to welcome the newest follower of the Cowgirl Press Gazette: Erin Johnson. Erin is a team member of mine on the Pfizer Animal Health account at Bader Rutter & Associates. Her family raises Shorthorn cattle in Wisconsin, and come to find out we have quite a few mutual friends-just another reason why I love the cattle industry. N. Starr

3 comments:

Elin Westover said...

When I was at The NCBA Convention a ranching couple really encouraged me to get my "MBA." I probably is not a bad idea

crystal.cattle said...

Congrats on starting the course. You will be an awesome Master of Beef advocate.

www.cdycattle.blogspot.com

Nicole Starr said...

Elin-I have only completed course 1; we could totally do this together. It's a great thing to do!
Crystal-Thanks-but I feel so behind the times; just about everyone I know has completed the MBA. It's been on my "list of things to do after college" and now I have to excuse!

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